Professor Brad D. Carter | BSc Qld , BSc(Hons) Qld , PhD Qld

Scientific Consultant

Reaching for the stars is something that Brad always intended to do. His fascination with science, space and technology started when he was very young, and has only deepened with time as he explored the infinite frontier of space.

Born in Brisbane, Australia, Brad was the first in his family to attend university where he realised his dream of becoming a scientist.

With a PhD in astrophysics from the University of Queensland firmly under his belt, Brad decided it was time to learn what else was out there.

“I want to make the world a better place and working for Fireball.International is one way I can do that.”

Professor Brad D. Carter

Starting his career at UNSW Sydney working on the development of a new telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, he travelled extensively for research in Europe and in the Americas.

A continuing academic post at the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) allowed Brad to build a team committed to delivering research performance at the highest possible rating of “well above world standard”.

During this time, he also led a team that transformed USQ’s Mt Kent Observatory into a key southern hemisphere research facility working alongside NASA.

Brad’s passion for all things space related is only matched by his passion for teaching and he has dedicated much of his career to teaching physics, astronomy, science and engineering in both face to face and online environments, ensuring anyone with a passion to learn had access to his knowledge.

Always seeking answers, research has formed a big part of Brad’s career, always seeking to advance our understanding of stellar atmospheres.

One of his research works includes the commissioning of an automated patrol telescope, which contributed to the discovery of over forty planets orbiting stars other than the Sun.

Another saw him play a key role in Australia’s involvement in Zeeman Doppler Imaging, which was an international research collaboration that overcame the difficulty of getting detailed views of distant stars by using their polarised light spectrum to reveal images of stellar surfaces and magnetic fields.

Brad’s has seen more than 100 of his research articles published with many being cited in leading international journals.
After years building a successful university research team, Brad is now focused on advancing Australia’s role in a space-faring future and is working with

Fireball.International, universities, industry and government to apply astronomical and space research to tackling major global challenges such as wildfires.